Monthly Archives: August 2016

Bike and trailer

Skiiddii Bicycle Child Trailer Review

We purchased a trailer for our bikes to enable us to carry our toddler with us when we go for bike rides. We purchased the Skiidii Bicycle Trailer for $149 on eBay from seller Faji Plaza. The trailer has provision for two small children to ride on it side by side.

The trailer arrived in a flat square box weighing 17kg. We had ours delivered to our Australia Post postbox without any problems. Delivery occurred within a week of order.

On opening the box you find a large folded trailer body, some tubular sections, some wheels and other components. The tools required to assemble the trailer are provided with the kit, a couple of small spanners and an Allen key. I chose to use a socket set and ratchet spanner as this was easier. You’ll need an 11mm hex socket.

At first I thought no instructions were supplied and this made it difficult to figure out how to get the trailer properly assembled. However it turned out the instruction booklet had been wrapped up in the fabric cover for the trailer. Unfortunately, the instructions are pretty badly translated.

I started by unfolding the trailer body and installing the cross bar that supports the roof of the trailer and holds the uprights in the vertical position. It fits together using plastic brackets on each end and some locking pins.

Locking pin
Locking pin

After this I installed the axle(which required adjusting the holes it goes through). The wheels are locked into place with plastic clips that fit into retention grooves at the end of the axle. The diagrams in the assembly guide aren’t too helpful. Wheel protection bars are then connected which go around the outside of the wheels, retained by spring loaded locking pins.

The trailer can be used as a running pram, so either a front wheel or the tow bar can be attached. The tow bar attaches with two locking pins. You can then remove the bike attachment from the tow bar using its locking pin and install it on the bike’s rear axle. You simply remove one of the screws and put it on the axle before screwing it back on. I installed it on the side that didn’t have the gears.

The plastic brackets for the jogging handle are then installed, but I didn’t install the handle as I won’t be jogging with it. An orange safety flag is also provided. The fabric cover is attached with velcro at the front and back and provides a weathershield as well. There is pretty good visibility for your child to be able to see out.

Assembly took me about 45 minutes in total. Once done I attached it to the bike and gave it a try. At first I accidentally knocked the bike over but the trailer stayed upright. I was happy about that. Riding around with the trailer empty it bounces around quite a lot. With our toddler aboard it still bounces a lot but not too badly. The wheel protection bars do rattle a lot however. They don’t fit snuggly into their slots. So while they won’t fall off, they do make a bit of noise. I may look at putting some thin rubber in the slots so they don’t rattle.

Bike and trailer
Bike and trailer

The child harness isn’t particularly fancy, just being a strap system. This may be a bit of an issue for younger children. Our baby has no problems walking or sitting up but did tend to end up slumping down on the seat. For larger babies I don’t think this will be a problem.

Baby in trailer harness
Baby in trailer harness

Overall I’m happy with the Skiidii Bicycle Trailer so far. We haven’t taken it on long rides yet, but will in coming weeks. Build quality is pretty good for the price. The only real issue is the rattling of the wheel protection bars. I’m sure more expensive models would be much more solid. As noted the assembly manual isn’t too good either.

One other issue we did have was finding a suitable helmet. It seems they start at 48cm at the smallest. A smaller one would have been better for us.

Against Anti-Doping

It’s time to end anti-doping efforts. They have failed. More than that they are immoral.

Anti-doping regulations apply to all levels of sport, from junior, to elite professional, to masters. Yet we only test a small group of our elite athletes. Elite sport is only a tiny proportion of the actual sporting community. Who is checking that a junior soccer player isn’t being given a performance enhancing substance? Who is checking that a local B grade rugby league player isn’t taking performance enhancing substances.

I am an administrator of swimming at the masters level. We are an amateur sporting organisation, providing age group competition from ages 18 to 100 and higher. We are also covered by anti-doping rules. Just recently Lance Armstrong was prevented from competing as a masters swimmer because of his life time drugs ban.

Yet it’s likely that many masters athletes are taking prescription medications from the banned list. The banned list includes many medications such as vasodilators, stimulants, asthma treatments and growth factors.

Technically they’re supposed to provide us evidence of a medical need, but rarely do we get such evidence. Athletes could be taking a performance enhancing substance for a medical reason or not, but we have no way of knowing.

Why should we anyway? The medical conditions of amateur sports people should be their own business, nothing to do with us.

Advancing medical technology is one of the biggest arguments against our current anti-doping efforts. Several billion dollar companies are now working on anti-aging technologies and early indications are promising. In the past year Google has started a subsidiary named Calico Labs with the sole purpose of extending the human life span.

Already several medications are in testing that slow effects of aging. By definition these will be performance enhancing, allowing athletes to continue to perform like a young person as they age.

For instance, currently there is research going on into anti-aging effects that may be attributed to the diabetes drug Metformin. Belgian researchers found that mice treated with it lived 40% longer. The studies showed reduction in age related illness.(http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/2016/03/12/worlds-first-anti-ageing-drug-could-see-humans-live-to-120/)

How could we possibly deny our athletes access to this technology? Are we going to say that if you want to be an athlete, sorry you have to age naturally? It would be absurd to even ask athletes to deny themselves access to anti-aging treatments that the rest of the community can access.

How is this any different to athletes using performance enhancing drugs available now?

One of the arguments often cited is the dangers to the athlete, particularly in relation to drugs that are not highly tested or administered in ways they’re not listed for. This is a case where the prohibition creates additional danger. If such drugs were not being administered secretively, proper clinical research could be undertaken and everyone would benefit.

It’s time to end this expensive, failing and misguided war on doping. We can replace it with scientific advancement of performance and anti-aging science that can benefit everyone.